Jailed Mobster Vows Family Takeover

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Authorities say mobster Vito Rizzuto is scheming to exact revenge on rivals and seize power.

This Canadian Godfather wants to rule the world.

Bonanno soldier Vito Rizzuto has vowed to take control of the battered crime family when he gets out of federal prison in October — and exact murderous revenge on the rivals who rubbed out his father and son while he stewed behind bars, a jailhouse source says.

Rizzuto, serving 10 years for participating in the notorious “Donnie Brasco” triple homicide in 1981, said “I don’t just want to be godfather of Canada — I want to be godfather of the world,” the source said.

He’s got little to live for, so while locked up at a maximum-security pen in Florence, Colo., he’s been eating vegetarian, staying fit, sharpening his mind with games of pinochle — and plotting his coup, the source said.

“I’m 67 years old, and I know what to do,” he said, according to the source.

Rizzuto, who for years ran the Bonannos’ Canadian branch, is said to be the biggest mobster north of the border, and US investigators suspect he was behind the hit of rival Sal “The Iron Worker” Montagna, a former New York Bonanno boss, in Montreal in November.

They think the murder was part of Rizzuto’s power grab.

A law-enforcement source said he fully expected Rizzuto to get deported to Canada after being released and possibly make his move amid a flurry of violence in Montreal.
“It wouldn’t surprise me if he tried to get revenge,” said the source. “There’s been a war going on. It’s like the Wild West up there.”

The FBI had hoped the assassination of Rizzuto’s son, Nick, in 2009 and his father, Nicholo, a year later might dissuade him from returning to a life of crime. His brother-in-law also vanished.
Rizzuto even arranged for 24/7 security for his daughter, fearing that she would also get killed, the source said.

“But now he’s got nothing else to do,” said the source.

A trim 180 pounds, the 6-foot-2 gangster relished cooking healthy soups for himself and his fellow inmates. He worked out with brisk walks around a track.
“Good genetics,” he’d say of his youthful physique, the source said.

Rizzuto pleaded guilty in 2007 for being present during the killings, though he claimed his only role was to shout, “It’s a holdup!”

via The New York Post

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